Education

76 BSN in ten

Publication Date: November 2008 Vol. 3 Num. 11

Author: Susan Trossman, RN

Nurse leaders nationwide promote measure to benefit patient care and RNs’ careers.
To garner support for a measure that promotes initiatives requiring future nurses to obtain their BSN in 10 years to continue practicing, long-time New York registered nurse Karen Ballard invoked the rallying cry during ANA’s recent House of Delegates (HOD): “If not us, who? If not now, when?”
As it turns out, nurses who attended the ANA HOD—a meeting of nurse leaders from around the country—did not need much persuading; roughly 85 percent of the 501 delegates present for the vote approved the resolution.
“The vote shows that state [nurses associations] want to go this way, and I think it’s a reasonable, thoughtful, and doable approach to solving the RN educational conundrum,”  says Ballard, MA, RN, president-elect of the New York State Nurses Association (NYSNA), which along with the New Jersey State Nurses Association (NJSNA), submitted the resolution at the HOD. At issue are too few baccalaureate-prepared nurses who can take on an increasingly complex healthcare work environment and more readily enter master’s and doctoral programs and move into other much-needed roles, such as nurse educator.
In their report, NYSNA and NJSNA cited a recommendation by a 2001 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services panel calling for two-thirds of the nurse workforce to have a baccalaureate or higher degree in nursing by 2010. The majority of staff nurses working today, however, are graduates from associate degree programs and only a fraction continue on to earn higher degrees.
ANA support for a BSN-in-10 requirement as laid out in the HOD resolution would neither affect current RNs nor eliminate the existing and valued educational paths students take to enter the profession, such as through  associate’s degrees and diploma programs. Rather, it only would apply to individuals applying for initial licensure in states where legislation requiring them to obtain their BSN within 10 years has been enacted.
NYSNA and NJSNA, who’ve had wide support from their membership, have worked to get legislation introduced in their respective states this year. And that may be the  beginning.
“At the request of our state associations, ANA has developed a model bill that mimics the  New York and New Jersey legislation,” says Janet Haebler, MSN, RN, associate director of State Government Affairs at ANA. “We also are working on a strategic plan that will be available to other states wishing to pursue such legislation.”
The New York bill, crafted by the New York
Organization of Nurse Executives (NYONE), is patterned after an educational mandate for public school teachers, who must earn their master’s within 5 years of licensure.
However, because RN-to-BSN course requirements are doubled, the proposed length of time to complete the degree also is doubled, according to NYONE Executive Director Claire Murray, MS, RN, CNAA. “It translates to one course a semester,” she adds.

The effect of advanced education
Research linking a BSN-prepared workforce and better patient outcomes has been the driving force behind NJSNA promoting BSN-in-10 legislation in New Jersey, according to NJSNA Chief Executive Officer Andrea Aughenbaugh, RN. NJSNA membership solidly passed the “educational advancement resolution” at the association’s 2006 annual meeting.
“We always want to provide the best possible care for citizens of our state,” she says. “If we know we can save lives through advanced education, we must make it our professional goal.”
In a landmark 2003 study, Linda Aiken, PhD, RN, FAAN, FRCN, and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that a 10% increase in the proportion of nurses with a bachelor’s degree was associated with a 5% decrease in both the likelihood of surgical patients dying within 30 days of admission and the rate of failure to rescue. Their new study released this spring reaffirms that important link.
Improved patient outcomes has been the case at Rochester General Hospital in New York, where nurses have been offered incentives to earn their BSN. In 2002, 33% of staff nurses at the facility had their BSN degrees, compared with the current percentage of 47, says Deb Zimmermann, MS, RN, NEA BC, senior vice president and chief nurse officer at Rochester. When comparing quality-targeted data in 2002 and 2007, the rate of patient falls decreased from 4.9 to 3.25 per 1,000 patient days. The medication error rate decreased from 1.66 to 0.82 per 10,000 doses administered. The length of stay declined from 5.6 to 4.6 days.
Nurses also are more satisfied with their jobs; the RN vacancy rate at Rochester has plummeted from 22% to 3%. (This counters arguments that this potential education requirement could fuel the nursing shortage.)
“I’ve always believed that nurses who work at the bedside should be the most educated, not the least educated, especially given greater patient acuity and the complexity of care,” says Zimmermann, a NYSNA member. “When nurses have the tools and education they need, they can provide the best patient care and be better patient advocates. And having greater knowledge really gives nurses more confidence.”
When beginning to strengthen educational incentives in 2002, Zimmermann was able to negotiate a 20% to 25% tuition discount with several area colleges. Four also were willing to conduct courses on site and during off-shifts.
Rochester also upped its tuition assistance from $3,000 to $6,000 a year, and staff nurses were offered more flexibility in their scheduling. About 350 staff nurses are in school each year—with the majority pursuing bachelor’s and many others earning higher degrees.
Zimmermann found that an initial barrier to staff nurses going back to school is their fear of failure. She also discovered that what often helps them finally take the plunge and succeed is teaming up with a coworker.
Edie Miskewicz, RN, knows the feeling of uncertainty tied to going back to school. An RN for 29 years, she decided to work toward her BSN starting in January 2006 and is nearly done. Her motivation has been to strenghten her professional credentials and broaden her career opportunities.
“I knew there would be a big learning curve, including using the educational technology like online study that’s available today,” says Miskewicz, who provides integrative care and wellness services to cardiac rehab patients and community residents through St. Peter’s Hosptial in Albany, New York. “It’s been challenging, but exhilirating. What I’ve found is that getting my associate’s degree taught me the ‘how’ of being a nurse, while the baccalaureate program has taught me the ‘why’ behind certain nursing interventions. It’s also given me a fuller view of the profession of nursing.” She believes the increased emphasis on theory helps build greater collaborative and decision-making skills, while clarifying the distinct nature of the nursing model of care.
Working in cardiac ICU, Brett Morey, RN, BSN, always had to meet critical care competencies, such as advanced hemodynamics and vent care. But completing his BSN theory courses also helped him better understand why he took certain actions. “A nice surprise was that I did learn a lot about my job while getting my BSN,” says Morey. “The courses really expanded upon what I learned through my associate’s degree.”
Morey says the online curriculum focused largely on implementing research and evidence-based practice—crucial to today’s emphasis on meeting quality-performance standards, fulfilling the leadership role, and ensuring competent care to culturally diverse patient populations. “After taking many of these classes, I’ve really changed my approach to patients and their families. And I have a better understanding of post-op patient needs, from teaching to discharge planning.”
Morey didn’t find getting his BSN onerous, and he was fortunate that his facility paid for his education. Since completing the degree a few months ago, Morey says it’s “paid off for him already.” He just landed a combination clinical-administrative position at a Connecticut hosptial, which is an opportunity that wouldn’t have been open to him had he not pursued his BSN.

Making it happen
Miskewicz believes tuition assistance, employer support, and mentoring are critical to staff nurses successfully obtaining advanced degrees. ANA and other nurse leaders agree.
Ballard sees the initiative as a win-win for nurses and employers—especially considering staffing shortages. “It can cost hospitals thousands of dollars to recruit and orient nurses,” she says. “Employers can take those same dollars and put them into work-and-learn programs, and they will have much happier employees.”
Murray also notes that employers now are competing with each other, using education assistance as a nurse retention strategy.
Of course not all states have the same educational resources to help RNs advance their education, and online programs can be expensive. Political environments also may be a barrier. Aughenbaugh believes that the barriers are starting to fall, but it’s imperative that nurses be able to articulate that nursing is an intellectual profession and why additional education is needed.
Haebler points out that other healthcare professions have already strengthened their educational requirements for continued practice. But the bottom line is improving patient care and ensuring a future nurse workforce.
“We need BSN and master’s-prepared nurses who can bring evidenced-based nursing practice to life,” Ballard says. “And we desperately need more nurse faculty for the future of our profession.”

Susan Trossman is Senior Reporter in ANA’s Communications Department.

76 thoughts on “BSN in ten

  1. Anonymous

    When a nurse goes back to earn a BSN, there are no new clinical skills taught. RN to BSN programs have no clinical component at all. In other words, it won’t make one a better nurse. We all are required to pass the same state licensing exam and we all graduated from nursing programs that were accredited to enable us to take that exam. The only difference between graduates of hospital based nursing programs and those of BSN program is that the BSN students write more papers.

    Reply
  2. Anonymous

    I think a BSN should be the minimal entry into this profession. Two additional years of schooling teaches analytical skills, critical thinking and leadership. You can’t be a physician and take a short cut into the profession. If we let the patients decide they will all agree more education better outcome. There is research out there that supports this.

    Reply
  3. Anonymous

    Analytical skills and critical thinking in nursing situations come from experience gained by working with seasoned, experienced nurses; not from spending more time in a classroom or writing more papers. Critical thinking and analytical skills are built into every nursing program anyway. Most of those in favor of having the BSN as the minimum requirement for entering the nursing profession are those affiliated with academia. And it is only academia that stands to gain from such a change.

    Reply
  4. jamato8

    Having practiced for 11 years I have not seen a true difference in outcome between 2 year, 4 year, maters and doctorate degree nursing. The experience seem and thought that goes with this from all that I have seen, determines the outcome. A couple of the best nurses I know, with the greatest depth of knowledge in an ICU environment, are a couple of nurses I know from a 2 year program.

    Reply
  5. Anonymous

    I have taught in RN to BSN courses for about 10 years. With rare exception, RNs entering the program believe the degree will not help them be “better nurse,” but rather it will give them greater career mobility. By “better nurse,” they typically mean skills and bedside care. By the time they make it through the first semester, the see the difference in the two levels of nursing education and realize that yes, a BSN will indeed make them a better nurse because nursing is more than skills.

    Reply
  6. Anonymous

    The nursing profession has drastically changed over the years. With today’s complex healthcare system and shifts in healthcare to profit management and corporate manifestation, the nurse of today has to be able to broaden their horizons to more than just the simple bedside manner that is taught in simple clinical settings. The BSN does prepare the future for nursing and exposes the nursing student to concepts that are deeper, allowing them to enter today’s market with a sense of readiness.

    Reply
  7. berrkk

    Here’s why the emphasis on the BSN is growing: Today practice is evidence-based, so let’s look at the evidence. Linda Aiken’s landmark study found that a 10% increase in the number of BSN prepared nurses was associated with a 5% decrease in the odds of the patient duing within 30 days of admission. The study derived data from 232,342 surgical patients and 10,184 nurses at 168 Pennsylvania hospitals.This is only 1 of many studies that found that the BSN was associated with better outcomes.

    Reply
  8. Lance

    Nursing is a job. If you punch a clock and are taking 30 minute lunches, you have a job.

    A profession however comes with autonomy and independent choices and decisions.

    Like it or not, nursing will never become a profession as long as nurses allow themselves to be pushed to the extremes. Introducing silly ideas as making a Bachelors Degree the only option to pass meds, wipe ass, suction patients, and TAKE and FOLLOW and CARRY OUT orders does not require a higher degree. A diploma works fin

    Reply
  9. Anonymous

    Lance: You obviously do not know anything about the nursing field and the critical thinking, decision making, and skills that take to be a nurse. A doctor may write orders but nurses are the ones watching the patients 24/7. They make independent decisions about patient care and perform more than just tasks. With out nurses there would be no health care. Nurses also take part in legislation, education, and research. It is more than just a profession it is a calling. Please have some respect.

    Reply
  10. DG

    I am an RN and two LVNS saved my life on two different occasions. That is evidence that I don’t think has been included in the research. Do I now request all RNs to be LVNs, based on the evidence and my interpretation of it? I think we need to understand the value in all nurses. That is probably why the doctor and the RN did not listen to the LVNs. Where’s that statistic? We will never be able to work as a team for the benefit of patient outcomes if we do not respect all team members.

    Reply
  11. ArmyNurse

    I am an ADN nurse in a busy ER, I hold the role of Team Leader which is not only a charge nurse position but also considered an assistant manager position. I am also responsible for the training of new employee’s. I may not have had all of the gym and book reading courses to make me a more “well rounded” nurse but I will put my skills and knowledge of nursing against any BSN nurse that has been in the field as long as I have.

    Reply
  12. ArmyNurse

    When I graduated at the Tech our teachers showed us a statewide report of NCLEX first time pass rates, our Tech school was number one in the state against all 2yr, 4yr, private, and public schools. Funny. I also serve in the US ARMY in the Nurse Corps, I will not be able to make it past the rank of CPT without my BSN, which is understandable. I do not agree with the BSN in 10. I have gained more nursing knowledge through my hands on job than any school can offer.

    Reply
  13. ProudNurse

    This issue is not about our personal experiences or feelings but about what the evidence is telling us. If you read Linda Aiken and others we have over 30 years of rigorous research that indicates reduced patient mortality and morbidity, improved nurse satisfaction and burnout with a higher percentage of BSNs. I understand that we all have opinions. However, if we are ever to move our discipline forward we must advance our education or run the risk of being left behind or becoming obsolete.

    Reply
  14. adam.lenth@yahoo.com

    How does “evidence” plan on finding these BSN Nurses to replace the ADN Nurses who will decide not to continue in Nursing and choose a different career path if they must go back to school anyway on top of the huge shortage we have now. We already cannot give our patients the nursing care that they need due to lack of nurses to assist in carrying these loads that we are expected to. I do not see this ever happening due to this.

    Reply
  15. RL

    We must remember that most RN’s want to practice at beside-by choice and realize that the more advanced your degree the further you are removed from the patient. As a RN who has an Associate Degree it has always amazed me that I would work along side advanced degree RN’s on the floor and we both made the same wage. I think that we could spend our time working on more important issues then this. We are a trade skill.

    Reply
  16. DoctorNurse

    I am concerned about placing a time mandate on RN’s for advancing their education. I am an doctoratally educated nurse who started as an ADN 26 years ago. I went back to school when I was able, which was 15 years ago…under this proposal I have been eliminated and not contributing to the profession as an educator, practitioner and scholar…Let’s be careful what we ask for. I support tuition and continuing education programs including speciality certifications. Maybe we do have it right…

    Reply
  17. Anonymous

    I am a foreign borne nurse educated in US. I have an ADN degree. It is interesting to see the power of “education lobby” in this country. Nursing is one of the professions which you could enter in 2-3 years with an associate degree.One can avoid high cost/debt of 4 year education and still make a solid money. They are working very hard to change that. Look at those new requirements for PTs and pharmacists (master’s and doctorate degrees required). Nursing is their next target. Schools would like

    Reply
  18. Anonymous

    If you have ADN, they will push you for BSN, then for master’s and then they will require a doctorate degree for higher positions. Nurses will pay them $600/ credit hour for masters just to find out that there are already too many nurses practitioners.

    Reply
  19. Alan

    I am all for further FREE education. Get your floor specific certifications, ACLS, PALS, TNCC etc. There are so many opportunities to improve real nursing skills. I know many nurses with BSN that are totally worthless, don’t know how to even start an IV and let their patient “wear their breakfast” all shift long while they are experts in “evidence based nursing”. They can talk theory all day long while keeping that chair seat nicely worm at nurses station.

    Reply
  20. Anonymous

    I just graduated from an ADN program, i feel like i went thru hell and now no employers will look at me because i dont have a BSN. If they gonna pass this law secure the nurses who are here now. it feels like discrimination to me. depressed nursing graduate :(

    Reply
  21. Anonymous

    LOVED how someone in the article said it has taught me the reason behind the intervention.. I think you should now that before doing it!!ppl like that dont need a bsn but some common sense. I am all for ceu’s and special training (acls,pals, ect…)but I feel that if you can not force teens to stay in school and further their education how can you force someone who has already choose a profession to further theirs.

    Reply
  22. Alisun

    BSN IN TEN DILEMMA
    BSN in ten is already creating a storm in the nursing industry as more, and more employers are requesting a BSN for entry level positions.

    According to the above excerpt it will not affect RN’s with diplomas, or AAS, but it is already affecting them. For starters, it’s becoming more and more difficult for AAS, and Diploma RN’s to obtain, and maintain employment because of the new requirement. The dilemma here is that some of our nurses enter the profession as adults; some

    Reply
  23. Anonymous

    I graduated in 1986 with a ASN and have worked for the past 20 yrs on the same floor. I say that speaks volumes. It seems to be the gossip around work these days. Everyone asking each other with ASN, “What are you going to do when you don’t have a job in 10 years?” By that time I will have been a nurse for 35yrs. I think they better have a grand father clause in there somewhere because if not there will be a lot of lawsuits.

    Reply
  24. Armynurse22

    I am glad to see some debate in this issue. It does truly seem that some of the nurses that are posting on here with 4 year degree plus are partial to their own 4 year standard because they aleady have it… You cannot tell me that a new grad 4 year student is going to compete with my 2 year degree, PALS, NALS, ACLS, ABLS, TNCC, and ENPC with 5 years of working as an ED RN with a total of 10 years in the ED. Support the 4 year degree all you want on the job exper. and cert. is what matters…

    Reply
  25. Bellona153

    I see your point Armynurse22 but consider also this: Give that same BSN new grad 5 years of ED experience. Give them the same opportunity that your workplace provides to also obtain PALS, NALS, ACLS, ABLS, TNCC, and ENPC and not only will that BSN prepared nurse stand toe-to-toe with you, they will exceed you in critical thinking skills, leadership skills and collegial respect. The BSN is necessary to meets the demands of escalating increase in complexity in our field of nursing.

    Reply
  26. BSN, MSN, RN

    This is absolutely necessary! Those of you who are posting and do not have a BSN can in no way understand the value of this education. Yes, experience is great as well. But education is priceless.

    Reply
  27. Chris

    I am appalled at the level and tone of disrepect in people’s respnses. Most of the comments clearly demonstrate the lack of understanding of the profession, lack of pride and total disregard for science. Sad.

    Reply
  28. nurseducator24

    The article specifically says that BSN in ten legislation would not affect ADN educated nurses who are already practicing.

    Reply
  29. learning new things

    I have been in nursing for 18 years my asociate degree. when I first heard about the bill I was ofended because I know that I am a good nurses. I follow all the rules and i am care for my patients and I am compassionate I have all the right qualities but most important I love nursing. Needless to say I returned to school to obtin my BSN and the reason being that it’s a reality we need highr education to promote a higher level of quality care let face it thingsa are changing and should we

    Reply
  30. Dave

    With the anticipated nursing shortage (which will be more evident when the economy clears up) no one is going to be in a position to place limits on the amount of nurses that can work.

    Reply
  31. Cheri

    We call ourselves a profession yet we cannot agree on entry level education. Doctors, lawyers and engineers would never allow 3 different levels of education to all sit for the “same” exam. We create our own problems in nursing which is why many still see us as the handmaidens of the physicians. It’s time to clean up our act & truly become respected in the realm of professionals.Evidence based practice gives credence to what we do. Nursing is an art & a science. Don’t forget the science.

    Reply
  32. Nurse Brown

    New york will find ways to keep folks in debt wehter it be thru high taxes, high cost of living or higher education, they know that the average working stiff like me who can not afford to go bak to school will have to take out another round of student loans to pay for this”BSN in ten” venture, just another way to keep you in debt, how about I get my BSN in ten then go practice nursing in another state…

    Reply
  33. J Regal

    It is pathetic to think that RNs can’t complete a bachelor’s degree in 10 years. In my organization the clerical staff is more educated than the RNs and it is evident in the quality of the work that is produced. Nursing does involve many “tasks” but strong written an oral skills are just as important.

    Reply
  34. Kemrn99

    I am overjoyed to learn of this initiative. I work with a diverse group of nurses in multiple hospitals in the Chicago area in critical care. I have also worked in other hospitals around the country. There is a definite difference in the level of care, autonomy, and respect for the profession with regards to education. Baccalaureate nurses, in my experience, have a broader foundation and more confidence in approaching patient care. The managerial skills and ability to prioritize using scientific

    Reply
  35. Anonymous

    I went back to school after 15 years and got my BSN and I’m also half way through my masters. It’s a great feeling of reward and accomplishment. I think differently and see thing in ways I have not seen them before. Be more educated definitely make you a better nurse.My critical skill are much better.

    Reply
  36. Anonymous

    To everyone who made spelling mistakes and grammatical errors in their comments: no amount of education will make you a better nurse if you don’t take the time to avoid mistakes in an activity as seemingly inconsequential as writing a comment online. Oral and written communication skills are essential for being taken seriously as a professional, and practice in this area will prepare you to avoid errors in all facets of nursing. Thank you, a future patient.

    Reply
  37. What is RN to BSN?

    This article so informative. I work with a diverse group of nurses in multiple hospitals in the Chicago area in critical care. I have also worked in other hospitals around the country. There is a definite difference in the level of care, autonomy, and respect for the profession with regards to education. Baccalaureate nurses, in my experience, have a broader foundation and more confidence in approaching patient care.Thanks for sharing this article.
    What is RN to BSN?: http://careersinnursing.bl

    Reply
  38. says

    To J. Regal
    So, you’re a secretary? Did you go to nursing school, pass state boards, and then deal with life and death on a daily basis? I would venture to say how pathetic you are to even comment on this and be so demeaning to those who give so much for so little pay or thanks. We are sworn at, yelled at, and even hit. From someone who has 2 bachelor’s degrees; one a BSN, and am completing a Master’s in Nursing education. I already plan on warning my students about ungrateful people like you

    Reply
  39. David Huber

    A post-ADN degree would certainly help make a better nurse. But an initial BSN? Not likely. An extra year of chemistry or biology with a religion or literature course thrown in gives little applicable advantage. Nevermind that private universities have a much lower caliber of student than the highly competitive entrance required for admission to community colleges.

    Reply
  40. Peter DiGiuseppe

    Why the BSN push? “200 college and university campuses have closed during the last 10 years due to decreasing enrollments as baby boomers aged”(Nursing Spectrum, Jan. 9, 2012). Many hospitals now rent space to schools offering RN-BSN programs. To earn Magnet Status, hospitals need a certain number of BSN nurses. The ANA is then paid thousands of dollars for a contrived seal of approval. It’s not about the patients, it’s about business. The more you buy into it, the more they’ll push it.

    Reply
  41. Peter DiGiuseppe

    Just like all other so-called experts in favor of the BSN push, Karen Ballard is affiliated with academia. She is an associate professor at a university. All these “experts’ are backed by the AACN; an organization committed to the BSN entry. Once they have most nurses running back for BSNs, they will then tell you a Master’s is needed to give the profession respect. The Aiken study has been proven to be flawed. This is one big money making scheme for four year schools. It’s deplorable!

    Reply
  42. Peter DiGiuseppe

    To Nurse Brown: You’re one of the few who got it. Read my Jan. 18 entry. This one reason for the BSN push. It’s also a pat on the back for hospital management. If nurses aren’t angry already; the money nurses pay in dues to belong to their state nurse’s associations is being used to lobby for the BSN and higher degree mandates. In other words, nurses are paying dues to ensure they’ll be in debt the rest of their lives. Wake up nurses! You’re being scammed like never before! Fight back!

    Reply
  43. Jo

    The ANA is the most venal, self-centered, prevaricating,bunch of people I’ve ever had the misfortune to study. The more I find out about them, the more sickened I become. Jut look how they’ve treated the last two years worth of new grads.

    Reply
  44. Peter DiGiuseppe

    Encouraging nurses to further their education is OK. Hospitals telling 40-50 yr old nurses with 20+ yrs experience and specialty certifications that they must now go into debt for $20,000-$30,000 and get a BSN within 3 yrs is deplorable. It should be an individual choice and not that of academic elitists. Next they’ll say you need a Master’s then a PhD to give the profession the respect it deserves. Call your state legislatures and voice your opposition to any mandates. Stop this scam now.

    Reply
  45. Peter DiGiuseppe

    We know the push for nurses to obtain BSNs is purely money driven to benefit 4 year colleges and hospitals seeking a contrived seal of approval called “Magnet Status. For hospitals to force nurses; many in their 40s and 50s with well over 20 years experience and specialty certifications to spend $20,000+ for a BSN or risk termination is ludicrous. Many have stated they would leave nursing. This would be detrimental A TV station may be interested if nurses will talk. PD, Phila., PA

    Reply
  46. CJ EdD RN

    Because of the broader and more in-depth education enhances the student’s professional development and allows the BSN graduate to better understand the many social,cultural, economic and political issues that impact patients and influence healthcare.
    Research has shown proportion of the BSN increased in hospitals, patient deaths decreased. These studies demonstrate that lower levels of patient mortality are associated with the nurses’ education levels.

    Reply
  47. sherry

    Where are these “statistics” of better pt. outcomes of pts. being cared for by BSN’s coming from? Give me an experienced associates degree RN over a nurse who has too much “book learning” any day. No amount of classes can teach compassion and common sense, aka “critical thinking skills”.

    Reply
  48. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  49. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  50. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  51. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  52. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  53. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  54. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  55. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  56. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  57. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  58. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  59. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  60. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  61. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  62. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  63. Lucy

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  64. smith.1795@wright.edu

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  65. smith.1795@wright.edu

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  66. smith.1795@wright.edu

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  67. smith.1795@wright.edu

    I have worked with a lot of nurses, some with higher education and others like myself ADN. I have seen top quality ADN nurses as well as BSN and MS. Having more knowledge is a great tool, and will make good nurses great, however, the nurses that do just enough, will always do just enough. I feel having the MS degree will increase the care I give my patients and their families. Knowing how a system works will help me identify when it is not working properly, as well as the transition to profe

    Reply
  68. Avenging spirit

    To BSN, NSN, RN Feb. 18 1012. Colleges and universities are the biggest rackets going today. That includes the one you’re affiliated with. Just like Magnet Status is nothing more than a marketing gimmick meant to deceive the uninformed general public. So you’d rather an inexperienced BSN as your nurse over an RN with 20+ years experience. That I’d love to see. Instead of education is priceless, your last line should read; education is pricey.

    Reply
  69. RN, BSN, MSN-c

    to avenging spirit
    You seem very bitter and your ignorance is evident in your posting. I am a 20+ years nurse who has pursued higher education and work with several 20+ nurses who have not. While I might not agree with pursuing Magnet status, the quality issues are real and must be addressed.I guess the question for you is “are you a life long learner even without formal education” or you just happy with “there’s nothing wrong with the way we have always done it?”

    Reply
  70. Avengingspirit1

    In response to RN, BSN, MSn-c:
    Your ignorance is displayed by your blind willingness to believe as gospel one study which was never replicated and contained flaws that were too numerous to be fully mentioned. Courses such as Theoretical Foundations for Nursing, Ethics, Leadership and Current Issues are all incorporated into every nursing program. Taking them in an RN-BSN program has no clinically relevance. It’s disgusting how nursing has gone from being about patient care to making money.

    Reply
  71. Anurse4real

    I have been a nurse for almost 18 years and I believe from my rewarding career that I have done well as a ADN nurse. I do believe that there is a need for more education. But I agree that the education should nursing specific vs liberal studies especially if you have a nursing degree already. I think good safe nursing care is not education related vs the challenge of nurses willing to work as hard as the profession demands. Nursing is seriously hard work an some are not willing to work that

    Reply
  72. Anonymous

    I am one of those associates degree nurses that didn’t think anything would change if I got my bachelors degree. I can now say I was wrong, I pay much better attention to providing evidence based care. Can this replace a ADN with 20 years of knowledge? Maybe not, but since evidence based care focuses on current evidence, not 20 year old evidence, I’d take the nurse that stays current no matter what the degree. For me personally, I’m glad I got my RN-BSN.

    Reply
  73. Avengingspirit1

    You are all a bunch of robots. The only so-called evidence that more BSN nurses = better patient outcomes was put out there by the people and institutions who’ll benefit by having nurses scramble back to school. Notice how they emphasize that it has to be a BSN from a four year school; not continuing education in a specialty area or certifications that demonstrate excellence in a specialty. Those driving the BSN push don’t care about nurses or patients; they only care about the revenue.

    Reply
  74. Anonymous

    young nurses are going back for bsn because they don’t want to do bedside its hard work and too much for them. and evidence based is only as good as the evidence going in not the manipulation to make it work !!! education is always needed especially within each department. and shared governance is really dictatorship. nursing has really changed and hospital CEOS make more now then ever. kind of reminds me of the banking situation before our wonderful recession started. lets wait and watch

    Reply