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Nurses are important, influential healthcare providers – are you talking to them? 

If you are interested in reaching the most active, dynamic and diverse community of nurses in the country, consider American Nurse Today, the official journal of the American Nurses Association (ANA) as your premier communications partner. 

Our promotion and educational programs utilize integrated channels including traditional print and cutting-edge electronic delivery options.

Electronic Media Kit

Need to speak with someone?

Contact Sofia Goller, Vice President, Sales and Marketing via email or call 215-489-7002 to talk about all of our cost-effective and creative promotional, educational and sponsorship opportunities!

As the official journal of ANA, American Nurse Today offers something that no other journal can. . .an opportunity to engage with the members of the only broad-based nursing organization representing the 3.6 million nurses in the US – nurses who are actively involved on every level of nursing – from nursing leaders to nurses who provide quality patient care at the bedside every day.

American Nurse Today is published 12 times a year.  The journal continues to serve nurses in furthering the profession through succinct, practical, independent, evidence-based clinical data and information.  American Nurse Today is a comprehensive, timely, trusted information source that nurses rely on to:

  • Optimize patient outcomes
  • Cultivate an educational foundation of best practices
  • Enhance professional careers

Peer-reviewed clinical, practical, practice-oriented, career and health/wellness editorial offers something for everyone.  Our outstanding Editorial Advisory Board includes top nurse thought-leaders across all nursing specialties.  The journal’s in-house editorial staff, RNs with proven track records in nursing publishing, work with Editor-in-Chief, Lillee Gelinas MSN, RN, FAAN, to bring nurses a fresh perspective on key nursing issues every month.

Every issue includes:

Leading the Way – information focused on nursing leadership issues.

ANA on the Frontline – a special section in the journal devoted to news and information directly from nursing’s most influential advocate on both national and state levels.

Strictly Clinical – peer-reviewed clinical articles, including continuing education.  Editorial addresses best practices and a wide variety of useful, practical information that nurses can use in their practice immediately.

Practice Matters – legal and ethical issues, time management, negotiating contracts, Magnet recognition and drug topics are just some of the topics this section covers.

Career Sphere – tips, techniques and ideas to help nurses maximize their careers are discussed.

Mind/Body/Spirit – articles that remind nurses to “take care of the caregiver”

Content Marketing

In addition to print advertising, American Nurse Today offers innovative educational programs ranging from single-topic editorial projects (such as supplements, patient-focused education and more) to web course turnkey programs.

American Nurse Today offers several cutting-edge digital platforms to deliver your message to our community of over 250,000 nurses.  We would love to work with you to help you develop effective communications through:

  • E-blasts
  • Newsletters
    • Nurse Today
    • Mindful Nurse
  • Custom education programs ranging from supplements to advertorials
 
 
 
 

The Latest on AmericanNurseToday.com

  • Enculturating the value of process improvement

    Staff engagement within a culture of ownership and accountability makes the difference between successfully achieving and sustaining organizational outcomes. As healthcare organizations respond to the external pressures of rapidly evolving complexity and increasingly demanding regulation, the impact of organizational culture emerges as a critical element for organizational success. Key factors for successfully creating and sustaining a culture of nursing excellence include providing support for accountable,… Read more…

  • Fear of the low: What you need to know about hypoglycemia

    Approximately 25.8 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Especially with the diabetes rate rising yearly, you’re likely to care for many patients with this disorder. Of those diagnosed with diabetes, 80% take diabetes medication (oral drugs, insulin, or both). Hypoglycemia is one of the most feared complications of such diabetes treatments—feared by both patients and healthcare providers alike. Common in hospital… Read more…

  • Become a successful preceptor

    Novice nurses anxiously enter the workplace on their first day, nervously approaching the unit desk to ask for their preceptor, who will play a key role in their transition to the unit. New nurses acclimate themselves to the unit, role, and staff with guidance from the preceptor. The goal of the preceptor is to provide valuable teaching and learning experiences and to role model safe… Read more…

  • Achieving a work-life balance

    Almost everyone agrees that achieving a work-life balance is a good thing. Without it, we risk long-term negative effects on our physical and mental health, our relationships, and our work performance. But many nurses have a hard time achieving this balance due to job demands, erratic work schedules, or inability to say no when someone asks for help. The challenges of stress and burnout Stress… Read more…

  • Managing knee osteoarthritis in older adults

    A degenerative joint disease, osteoarthritis (OA) is marked by cartilage erosion, osteophyte formation, joint hypertrophy, and subchondral sclerosis. A leading cause of disability in older adults, it affects more than 30% of American older than age 65. It’s more prevalent in women than men. Overall risk rises with age. About 80% of people with OA of the knee report movement limitations, and 25% have difficulty… Read more…

  • Evaluating the neurologic status of unconscious patients

    neurologic status of unconscious patientsAssessing the neurologic status of unconscious or comatose patients can be a challenge because they can’t cooperate actively with your examination. But once you become proficient in performing this exam, you’ll be able to detect early significant changes in a patient’s condition—in some cases, even before these show up on more advanced diagnostic tests. Subtle changes in findings may indicate the need for further testing.… Read more…

  • FDA approves digital tracking pill

    fda abilify mycite pill trackerOn Nov. 13, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Abilify MyCite, a pill with a sensor that digitally tracks if patients have ingested their medication. Read more via Fda.gov.

  • FDA permits marketing of device to help reduce opioid withdrawal symptoms

    fda opioid withdrawal symptomOn Nov. 15, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted a new indication to an electric stimulation device (NSS-2 Bridge) for use in helping to reduce the symptoms of opioid withdrawal. Read more via Fda.gov.

  • Protein identified as critical for keeping Alzheimer’s disease pathology in check

    A study by scientists at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute suggests that a protein called membralin is critical for keeping Alzheimer’s disease pathology in check and could provide a new path toward future treatments for Alzheimer’s disease. Read more. via Technology Networks

  • Behavioral emergency response team improves safety

    behavioral emergency response team improve safetyA behavioral emergency response team helps de-escalate behavioral emergencies, thereby reducing assaults and use of restraints, according to a study in Worldviews on Evidence-based Nursing. Read more via Onlinelibrary.wiley.com.

  • Landmark study may impact standard stroke treatment guidelines

    A new milestone study with results published in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that clot removal up to 24 hours after stroke led to significantly reduced disability for properly selected patients. Read more. via news.emory.edu

  • Hazardous drugs, a safety blind spot

    drugs safety pills antKnow the risks of handling many commonly administered drugs.  WARFARIN, OXYTOCIN, CLONAZEPAM—registered nurses administer millions of these drugs daily with little awareness that they are hazardous, as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (CDC/NIOSH). Interestingly, not all hazardous drugs come with a hazard label. An evolving awareness Since the 1960s, reports indicated that certain drugs may… Read more…

  • FDA approves first treatment for Erdheim-Chester Disease

    fda treatment erdheim chester disease cancer bloodOn Nov. 6, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expanded approval of Zelboraf (vemurafenib) to treat certain adult patients with Erdheim-Chester Disease. Read more via Fda.gov.

  • Building Your Communication Skills Part 3

    Marjorie Lee North, a consultant for political candidates, physicians, and lawyers, presented these ten tips in her blog on the Harvard University Division of Continuing Education Professional Development website: 1.     Nervous is normal. Practice and prepare. 2.     Know your audience. Your speech is about them, not you. 3.     Organize your material in the most effective manner to attain your purpose. 4.     Watch for feedback and… Read more…

  • HIV patients at greater risk for heart, kidney disease

    hiv heart attack kidney diseasePatients with HIV who are at high risk for a heart attack or stroke are also at substantially greater risk for chronic kidney disease and vice versa, according to a study in PLOS Medicine. Read more via Journals.plos.org.

  • Virtual reality used to reduce blood draw pain in children

    child draw blood virtual reality painA study in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology reports that virtual reality can be used to significantly reduce patients’ and parents’ perception of acute pain, anxiety, and general distress during blood draw.Read more via Academic.oup.com.

  • UTIs: The Fourth Most Common Type of Healthcare-Associated Infection

    Virtually all healthcare-associated UTIs are caused by instrumentation of the urinary tract, and 12% to 16% of adult hospital inpatients will have an indwelling urinary catheter at some time during their hospitalization. For each day of indwelling urinary catheter use, a patient’s risk of a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) increases 3% to 7%. Complications associated with CAUTI lead to patient discomfort, prolonged hospital stays,… Read more…

  • Fighting emerging threats

    Three years ago, the American Nurses Association (ANA) and nurses nationwide found themselves on the frontlines of a crisis when the Ebola virus made its way to the United States, killing one patient and infecting two RNs who provided care to him. The crisis wasn’t in the number of cases in this country—four diagnosed and 11 treated—but in the need to ensure that healthcare workers could keep themselves and the public safe when faced with a potentially fatal infectious organism. Read more…

  • Nurses rise to disaster challenges

    While working the night shift in the surgical intensive care unit (ICU) of her New Jersey hospital, Teresa Weisneck, BSN, RN, could not help but be moved by the heartbreaking images she saw flashing on the TV screen in her patient’s room. Hurricane Harvey was wreaking havoc in Houston and the surrounding communities. Read more…

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