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Genitourinary

Virtually all healthcare-associated UTIs are caused by instrumentation of the urinary tract, and 12% to 16% of adult hospital inpatients will have an indwelling urinary catheter at some time during their hospitalization. For each day of indwelling urinary catheter use, a patient’s risk of a catheter-associated urinary . . .

April 2014 Vol. 9 No. 4

Author: Miriam O. Young, MSN, RN

A study in Mayo Clinic Proceedings reports that the health benefits of male circumcision exceed the risks by more than 100 to 1. Overall male circumcision rates have recently declined. Read more . . .

March 2014 Vol. 9 No. 3

Author: Cathy Catrambone, PhD, RN, FAAN; and Rachel Start, MSN, RN

A team approach reduces rates of major complications for complex spinal reconstructive surgery by two thirds, according to a report in Spine Deformity. The three main features are: two spine surgeons in the OR, a live preoperative screening conference, and monitoring bleeding during the operation. Read more . . .

December 2013 Vol. 8 No. 12

Author: Terri Townsend, MA, RN, CCRN-CMC, CVRN-BC; Pamela Anderson, MSN, RN, APRN-BC, CCRN;

Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), the most common healthcare-associated infection, can be deadly.

September 2013 Vol. 8 No. 9

Author: Amanda Nenaber, MS, RN,

A UK study in PLOS Medicine found that people with dementia have about three times the rate of urinary incontinence and more than four times the rate of fecal incontinence compared to those without dementia. Read more . . .

April 2013 Vol. 8 No. 4

Author: Cherrilyn F. Richmond, MS, FNP/WHNP-BC

Although painful and disruptive, interstitial cystitis often can be managed with drugs, bladder instillation and other procedures, and dietary changes. Most patients also need psychosocial support or professional counseling to deal with related stress, anxiety, depression, and frustration.

February 2013 Vol. 8 No. 2

Author: Lynne Hancock RN, MSN. NE-BC, and Diane Hanley MS, RN-BC, EJD

On Feb. 26, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Osphena (ospemifene) to treat women with moderate to severe dyspareunia (pain during sexual intercourse), a symptom of vulvar and vaginal atrophy caused by menopause. Read more . . .

January 2013 Vol. 8 No. 1

Author: BrandeeWornhoff, MSN, RN, CNS-BC; and Paula Spoonmore, MSN, RN, CNS-BC

On Jan. 18, 2013, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the use of Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) to treat adults with overactive bladder who can’t use or don’t adequately respond to anticholinergics. Botox’s safety and effectiveness for this new indication were established in two clinical trials . . .

October 2012 Vol. 7 No. 10

Author: Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN

Although experts recommend that patient-education materials be written at the fourth-through-sixth grade level, a study published online by the Journal of Urology found that only 4.8% of websites describing prostate cancer were written below a high school reading level. The median reading level was 12th grade . . .

April 2012 Vol. 7 No. 4

Author: Rose Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN

A study of 75,997 urine specimen results found that 63% of patients did not have results consistent with a physician’s order. Of those with inconsistent results, 60% tested positive for drugs not ordered by a physician and in 40% of cases, no drug was detected. Read more results . . .


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