Leadership and Mentoring

Do you remember a professor from nursing school who inspired and challenged you? Would you like to provide that kind of guidance for a new nurse? These articles offer tips and suggestions for how to be a leader and mentor who provides encouragement and honest critique for the net generation of nurses.

Are you an introvert? If so, you may think you don’t have the right personality to be a nurse leader. Susan Cain, the author of Quiet: The Power of Introverts, would beg to differ with you. With examples that span generations and continents, Cain shares stories of some of . . .

Marjorie Lee North, a consultant for political candidates, physicians, and lawyers, presented these ten tips in her blog on the Harvard University Division of Continuing Education Professional Development website:

1.     Nervous is normal. Practice and prepare.

2.     Know your audience. Your speech is about them, not you.

3.     Organize your . . .

The second installment of Marjorie Lee North’s Harvard University Division of Continuing Education Professional Development website blog, focuses on putting what you learned in her first blog into action with your colleagues and supervisors. She explores communication styles, group problem solving, and how to give and receive criticism. You . . .

In her Harvard University Division of Continuing Education Professional Development website blog, Marjorie Lee North, a consultant for political candidates, physicians, and lawyers, offers advice on:

·      Learning to listen

·      Knowing your audience

·      Paying attention to your nonverbal skills.

You can read the full blog here . . .

Tip 4 of 6 Mindfulness Exercises You Can Try Today

This exercise is designed to open your ears to sound in a non-judgmental way, and indeed to train your mind to be less swayed by the influence of past experiences and preconception.

So much of what we “feel” is . . .

Tip 3 of 6 Mindfulness Exercises You Can Try Today

This exercise is designed to cultivate a heightened awareness and appreciation of simple daily tasks and the results they achieve.

Think of something that happens every day more than once; something you take for granted, like opening a door, for . . .

March 2017 Vol. 12 No. 3

Author: Sonya Wood-Johnson, MSN, RN, PCCN; Suzanna Ho, MSN, RN; and Melanie Rainford, MSN, RN-BC, ACNS-BC

Today’s healthcare organizations need to improve patient safety, which includes effectively communicating information to nurses about safety incidents and how to address them. After all, frontline nurses are at the sharp edge of patient care—the last step before an error occurs. But communicating to staff in a large . . .

March 2017 Vol. 12 No. 3

Author: Stephanie A. Walton, MSN, RN, and Deb Sitter, MA, BSN, BSM, RN-BC

Our hospital systems’ journey to obtain Magnet® recognition led to an excellent opportunity: the chance to revamp and improve our nursing orientation program as part of the effort to achieve excellence in nursing practice. Our system consists of three hospitals that historically held separate nursing orientations—we combined them into . . .

February 2017 Vol. 12 No. 2

Author: Rose O. Sherman, EdD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN

Mary*, a new manager in the operating room, prides herself on being a strong advocate for her staff, quickly acting on every issue with which she’s presented. So she’s a little surprised when her leader-mentor Susan tells her that she’s developing a reputation for being overly . . .

February 2017 Vol. 12 No. 2

Author: Kim S. Hitchings, MSN, RN, NEA-BC; Tonya Kemp, RN; Sharon Kromer, BSN, RN; Barbara Labriola, MS, RN, CMSRN; and Lori Yesenofski, MSN, RN, CCRN

Since the Magnet® Vision was published in 2008, it has inspired actions by nurses at Lehigh Valley Hospital (LVH), a Magnet-recognized academic community hospital located in southeastern Pennsylvania. In 2011, when LVH received its third Magnet designation, we dissected the vision statement to stimulate goals to help LVH continue . . .

November 2016 Vol. 11 No. 11

Author: Cynthia M. Clark, PhD, RN, ANEF, FAAN

Civility is not situational. What a leader must manifest all day, every day, is civility, because civility is—or at least should be—an expectation and imperative for all of us…especially in health care.
—Michael S. Woods, MD, MMM, author and healthcare consultant
Recognizing, addressing, and preventing incivility calls . . .

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