Our Readers Respond

Letters to the Editor – January 2007

nurse white last note

Casualties of war
My mother read “Nursing Care on the Battlefield” in the November issue with great interest.
As an Army Nurse in World War II, she knows all too well the casualties of war. She cared for thousands of men without arms or legs, paraplegics, and those who ended up with psychiatric problems. She says their lives were ruined forever.
She often says that our leaders have no idea what the casualties of war are. Maybe they need to start finding out.

Cathy Buxengard BA, RN
Worthington, MN

No time for continuous insulin infusions
I read your article “Continuous insulin infusion therapy: It’s not just for the ICU anymore” in the November issue, and I agree that we need tighter insulin control. But on the telemetry unit where I work, I don’t see how I could safely use this model.
This week, I had an average of two diabetic patients plus two or three other patients. I simply do not have time to do insulin calculations and seek another nurse to verify them every hour, while still monitoring my patients.
We tried something similar on our units last year without success. Given current nursing shortage, where will hospitals find the extra hands needed for this model?

Lynda Bruce, RN
Fort Worth, TX

The Last Nurse in White
This magazine is so refreshing! I was really interested in the October article, “Dressing to Impress” because
I am still in whites and a cap! I am the last one in civilization, I am sure!
But I can tell you that not one single day goes by without patients, families, and physicians going out of their way to tell me how much they appreciate it. No matter what anyone says, it brings professionalism to the nurse, and it makes patients feel more confidence in the person taking care of them.

Ruby MacDonald RN, OCN
Brownsville, TX


Kudos for the newcomer
Thank you, thank you, thank you!
I am really enjoying the format of the American Nurses Association’s new publication. In a time when more nurses need to be involved in a professional organization, this publication should encourage membership and a sense of community.
I have shared my copy at work and have received very positive comments. One nurse told me that other nursing journals can be too time consuming to read, and this new journal really piqued her interest.
The Continuing Education Units apply to my practice, and the Career Sphere articles are great, too. I especially appreciated the article “How to survive a bully” in the November issue. We’ve all been there!
I read American Nurse Today from cover to cover. Please keep it coming!

Lorie Roever, RN, BSN
Staff Nurse, Bethesda Medical Center
at Arrowsprings
Lebanon, OH

Thank you so much for the rich variety of topics in the first two issues of American Nurse Today. My only concern is whether you’ll be able to maintain this variety of helpful articles issue after issue. I hope it will not be short-lived.
Bravo! Keep it up.

Doris Oyinloye, RN
Burnsville, MN

When the premier issue of American Nurse Today arrived in my mailbox, I thought nothing of it. I put it on top of a pile of journals I keep promising myself to read.
When I eventually opened it up, I was admittedly surprised to find so many articles that were relevant to my practice. I read it cover to cover and have shared several of the articles with colleagues.
I hope future editions are as informative and useful as the first one.

Brandy Mitchell, BSN, RN, BC
Seattle, WA

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One thought on “Letters to the Editor – January 2007”

  1. eileengallen says:

    Love the cover

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